Hyundai’s brake problem; Alfa Romeo, Citroen, Peugeot and Toyota report fuel leaks (week 51/21)



This week recalls:
– Hyundai Tucson – brake calliper
– Alfa Romeo, Citroen, Peugeot, Toyota – fuel leaks
– Tesla, Porsche – suspension
– Volvo XC40 – starter


Ten recalls for 17 models of 11 manufacturers were announced via Rapex in the 51st week of 2021.

Alfa Romeo, Citroen & DS, Hyundai, Mazda, Peugeot, Porsche, Tesla, Toyota, Volkswagen, and Volvo have one recall each – see the table at the end of the article.



A material defect in the right rear brake calliper is causing lower brake performance in nearly 4,500 Hyundai Tucson SUVs produced in October and November 2021 at the Czech factory.

Due to a manufacturing defect, fuel may be leaking through an integrated pressure and temperature sensor on the fuel supply line with approximately 5,800 Alfa Romeo Giulia and Stelvio vehicles with production dates between November 2020 and May 2021. Fuel may also be leaking in several Stellantis models, specifically 2017-2021 Peugeot and Citroen models. Toyota also reports the same problem for ProAce City, which shares a joint base with the French cars.



Volvo recalls 12,000 2019 Volvo XC40 SUVs that may have a starter motor failure. Mazda has announced a recall for older 2006-2011 Mazda6 and BT-50 pickups due to airbags.

Electric cars represented in this week’s review are the Tesla Model 3, Tesla Model Y and Porsche Taycan. All of the above may have a suspension issue.

Details on this week’s recalls can be found in the table below.




  • How satisfied are you with your car? Let us know! It’s anonymous, no registration required. Would you recommend your car to a friend?
  • Post an Owners’ Review Now


Recalls announced in the 51st week of 2021

Make, Model (years) Problem
Alfa Romeo Giulia (2020 – 2021) Due to a manufacturing defect, the integrated fuel pressure and temperature sensor may result in fuel leakage.
Alfa Romeo Stelvio (2020 – 2021) Due to a manufacturing defect, the integrated fuel pressure and temperature sensor may result in fuel leakage.
Citroen Berlingo (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
Citroen C5 Aircross (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
DS7 Crossback (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
Hyundai Tucson (2021) The rear brake calliper assembly, which has a material defect, causes lower brake performance.
Mazda 6 (2007 – 2010) Long-term exposure to humidity may cause the module of the passenger frontal air bag to explode.
Mazda BT-50 (2006 – 2011) Long-term exposure to humidity may cause the module of the passenger frontal air bag to explode.
Peugeot 508 (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
Peugeot Partner (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
Peugeot Rifter (2017 – 2021) Due to cabling and software upgrade issues, fuel may leak.
Porsche Taycan (2020) The rear axle track arms may become detached.
Tesla Model 3 (2019 – 2021) The lateral control arm of the front suspension may cause instability.
Tesla Model Y (2020 – 2021) The lateral control arm of the front suspension may cause instability.
Toyota ProAce City (2019 – 2021) There is a fuel leakage from the auxiliary heater, which could cause fuel to leak onto the road surface.
Volkswagen Atlas (2020 – 2021) The condensation drainage ducts on the air-conditioning housing were not punched through.
Volvo XC40 (2018 – 2019) The starter motor may fail, which can lead to noise or no engine start.

Where now?

Share on:

What the owner should do?

If you read about a recall that you think may affect your car, you should make immediate contact with a dealer or workshop that’s been officially authorised to perform repairs on behalf of the manufacturer and ask for the details.

If you wish to know more about eventual problems of a specific car (e.g. real mileage, potential traffic accidents damages, odometer rollback, repairs, etc.), then we suggest going to HPI-Check.

Check the vehicle's history


Start a discussion. Share your view: Post a Comment on Twitter

Weekly Newsletter

Do you want to receive a weekly overview of new car recalls?


All non-English texts are machine translated. Car-Recalls.eu accepts no responsibility for the accuracy of the translation. In case of discrepancies, the English version will prevail.

Deutsche version
Based on Weekly overview reports of RAPEX notifications, published free of charge in English on https://ec.europa.eu/rapex, © European Union, 2005 – 2022
The official contact points of the Member and EFTA-EEA States provide the information published in these weekly overviews. Under the terms of Annex II.10 to the General Product Safety Directive (2001/95/EC) responsibility for the information provided lies with the notifying party. The Commission nor the car-recalls.eu does not take any responsibility for the accuracy of the information provided.
The content owned by the EU on this website is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0) licence.